employment

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    High-tech sector has more than 101,000 people now working in software development, advanced tech... see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    B.C.’s technology sector leads in growth: report

    The province’s high-tech sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 people now working in software development, advanced technology and research around the province.

    According to figures released Wednesday by the provincial government, the tech sector, which employs about 20,000 directly in Greater Victoria, employs more people around B.C. than the mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined.

    According to B.C. Stats’ Profile of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2016 Edition, technology now employs 101,700 people earning a weekly average salary of $1,590 – 75 per cent higher than the average wage in B.C. and higher than the Canadian technology sector average of $1,480 per week.

    “For the fifth year in a row, B.C. has seen significant growth in its diverse technology industry. We have more technology companies than ever, with more technology workers, earning higher wages than the Canadian technology sector average,” said Amrik Virk, Minister of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services. “Our #BCTECH strategy is further creating the conditions that are helping the sector continue to grow and thrive.”

    B.C.’s tech sector also leads the country in terms of job growth. Employment in the tech sector rose 2.9 per cent, surpassing B.C.’s overall employment growth of 2.5 per cent and national tech sector employment growth of 1.1 per cent.

    Technology now employs approximately 4.9 per cent of B.C.’s workforce and is the third-largest tech workforce in Canada.

    The gross domestic product of the province’s tech sector grew by 2.4 per cent in 2015, contributing $14.1 billion to B.C.’s overall economic output.

    At the same time, tech revenue increased five per cent to a record $26.3 billion.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    10,100 more people employed in the city in December, Victoria’s employment grew 5.8% in 12 months see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    Greater Victoria’s employment growth over the last year led all B.C. locations, according to data released by Statistics Canada.

    With 10,100 more people employed in the city in December, Victoria’s employment grew 5.8 per cent over the last 12 months. The federal agency’s labour force survey indicated that was well ahead of Vancouver’s 4.2 per cent growth and the 4.5 per cent growth experienced in the Abbotsford-Mission region over the same period.

    “It’s been good, solid employment growth over the 12 months in Victoria,” said Statistics Canada spokesman Vincent Ferrao. He noted at 5.8 per cent Victoria was also near the top of the list Canada-wide.

    Guelph, Ont. topped the list with 9.1 per cent growth year-over-year; Kingston, Ont., reported 6.5 per cent growth.

    British Columbia had the fastest employment growth of all the provinces over the last year with employment in the province up 2.3 per cent (52,000 more jobs), the result of an upward trend that began in April.

    Statistics Canada noted the national growth rate was below one per cent at 0.09 per cent.

    But despite an increased number of employed people, Victoria’s unemployment rate was up significantly over the last year. As of December, the unemployment rate was 6.1 per cent, up from 5.0 in December 2014.

    “There were more people coming into the labour force over the last 12 months, which pushed the unemployment rate up to 6.1,” said Ferrao. He believes that is due to workers returning to B.C. from Alberta as that province’s economy slowed considerably.

    “Also maybe since there has been employment growth in Victoria, it has attracted more people to come in and look [for work],” added Ferrao.

    In Greater Victoria, the total labour force grew to 194,800 by the end of 2015, up from 182,000 in December 2014. The region has seen increased employment in retail and wholesale trade, which saw a jump of 4,200 to 28,000 positions over the 12 months, and gains of 1,500 jobs in construction and manufacturing.

    The only significant job loss over the year was in Statistics Canada’s “other services category,” which dropped 1,300 positions.

    Like Greater Victoria, B.C.’s unemployment rate rose in December despite more people being employed. B.C.’s rate now stands at 6.4 per cent, up from 5.8 a year earlier.

    The Canadian unemployment rate followed the same trend with an increase to 7.1 per cent from 6.7 per cent a year ago, despite a slight increase in the number of employed people — 18 million in December 2015, compared with 17.9 million in December 2014. Global economic uncertainty — and the ongoing impact of the collapse in oil prices — has weakened in Canada’s recovery, despite two cuts for interest rates in 2015.

    BY THE NUMBERS

    December unemployment

    (previous month in parentheses):

    • Unemployment rate7.1 per cent (7.1)
    • Employment rate61.2 per cent (61.2)
    • Labour force participation rate65.9 per cent (65.8)
    • Number unemployed1,386,400 (1,364,800)
    • Number working18,009,600 (17,986,800)
    • Youth (15-24) unemployment 13.0 per cent (12.7)
    • Men (25+) unemployment6.6 per cent (6.5)
    • Women (25+) unemployment 5.6 per cent (5.7)

    PROVINCES

    • Newfoundland14.4% (13.0)
    • Prince Edward Island9.7 (10.4)
    • Nova Scotia 8.6 (8.6)
    • New Brunswick 8.9 (8.7)
    • Quebec 7.8 (7.5)
    • Ontario 6.7 (6.9)
    • Manitoba 5.9 (6.1)
    • Saskatchewan 5.5 (5.5)
    • Alberta 7.0 (7.0)
    • British Columbia 6.7 (6.2)

    CITIES

    • St. John’s6.4 (6.2)
    • Halifax 6.2 (6.1)
    • Moncton, N.B. 6.2 (5.8)
    • Saint John, N.B. 7.7 (7.3)
    • Saguenay, Que. 7.5 (7.6)
    • Quebec 4.9 (4.8)
    • Sherbrooke, Que. 6.6 (6.3)
    • Trois-Rivieres, Que. 7.3 (6.9)
    • Montreal 8.7 (8.6)
    • Gatineau, Que. 6.1 (6.4)
    • Ottawa 6.3 (6.3)
    • Kingston, Ont. 6.5 (6.7)
    • Peterborough, Ont. 7.6 (8.6)
    • Oshawa, Ont. 7.0 (7.8)
    • Toronto 7.0 (7.0)
    • Hamilton, Ont. 5.9 (6.0)
    • St. Catharines, Ont. 8.0 (7.8)
    • Kitchener-Waterloo 6.4 (5.9)
    • Brantford, Ont. 4.9 (5.4)
    • Guelph, Ont. 4.2 (4.2)
    • London, Ont. 6.2 (6.8)
    • Windsor, Ont. 9.7 (10.0)
    • Barrie, Ont. 6.4 (6.1)
    • Sudbury, Ont. 8.4 (8.2)
    • Thunder Bay, Ont. 5.7 (5.3)
    • Winnipeg 6.1 (5.7)
    • Regina 4.1 (4.0)
    • Saskatoon 6.4 (6.1)
    • Calgary 7.0 (6.9)
    • Edmonton 6.2 (6.1)
    • Kelowna6.7 (6.2)
    • Abbotsford7.6 (7.2)
    • Vancouver 5.7 (5.8)
    • Victoria 6.1 (6.3)
  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    BC's tech sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 ppl now working in its ranks see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    B.C.’s tech job force bigger than mining, oil and gas, forestry

    British Columbia’s technology sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 people now working in its ranks.

    Data Wednesday from the province show the tech sector — which employs about 20,000 in Greater Victoria — employs more people around B.C. than the mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined.

    According to B.C. Stats’ Profile of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2016 Edition, technology employs 101,700 who earn a weekly average salary of $1,590 — 75 per cent higher than the average wage in B.C. and higher than the Canadian technology sector average of $1,480 per week.

    “For the fifth year in a row, B.C. has seen significant growth in its diverse technology industry. We have more technology companies than ever, with more technology workers earning higher wages than the Canadian average,” said Amrik Virk, minister of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services.

    “Our strategy is further creating the conditions that are helping the sector continue to grow and thrive.”

    B.C.’s tech sector, which has more than 9,900 companies, also leads the country in terms of job growth. Employment in the sector rose 2.9 per cent over the previous year, surpassing B.C.’s overall employment growth of 2.5 per cent and national tech-sector employment growth of 1.1 per cent.

    Technology now employs about 4.9 per cent of B.C.’s workforce and is the third-largest tech workforce in Canada.

    The gross domestic product of the province’s tech sector grew by 2.4 per cent in 2015, contributing $14.1 billion to B.C.’s overall economic output. At the same time tech revenue increased five per cent to a record $26.3 billion.

    “I think it is wonderful news and a long time in the making,” said Victoria tech veteran Eric Jordan, CEO of Codename Entertainment. “This didn’t happen overnight, but is the result of decades of effort from many people and organizations in our community.”

    Jordan said Victoria’s tech community has a lot going for it. “Victoria continues to be a great place to build technology companies, including video-game companies. We are large enough to have a variety of critical supports, such as educational institutions like UVic and Camosun, as well as easy access to key hubs such as Vancouver, Seattle, Toronto and San Francisco,” he said.