Google

  • Nadia Tatlow posted an article
    In an email to partners this week, Google shared some plans to launch their new web interface. see more

    Victoria, B.C. — In an email to partners and G-Suite administrators earlier this week, Google shared plans to launch a new Gmail web interface soon.

    Google described the new interface as “a fresh, clean look for Gmail on the web” with some exciting additions like “Smart Reply on the web, just like on mobile.” 

     

    Shift, a desktop built by the team at Redbrick, has released exactly what the new designs will look like within Shift, allowing Gmail customers to access all of the new features and easily switch between multiple Mail, Calendar and Drive accounts.

     

    The Compose button, and right-hand views for Calendar, Keep, and other Google apps are displayed inside Shift, which will handle the multiple account matrix for Gmail customers with several accounts, as well as third-party apps and extensions like Slack, WhatsApp, Trello, Evernote, Grammarly, LastPass, and others.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    “All of the right-hand views for Google Apps will be similar to a mobile view, and easier for at-a-glance Calendar view when writing an email and trying to plan a meeting at the same time. For the full week or month view, Shift offers Gmail customers an easy way to toggle between multiple Mail and Calendar views and accounts, ” said Director of Product, Michael Foucher. 

     

    The ability to “snooze” emails and have them returned to your inbox later is another nice addition. Many Gmail users will appreciate having that functionality built right in. Another new Gmail feature, Offline Support, will give Shift customers much more flexibility when looking to get stuff done while off the grid.  

     

     


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    For more information about this story, please contact:


    Nadia Tatlow

    General Manager
    nadia@tryshift.com
    +1 (250) 216-0019

    https://tryshift.com/

     

     

  • Redbrick posted an article
    The Latest Version of Shift Adds Much Anticipated Support For Boomerang & Grammarly see more

    Redbrick Launches Shift 2.0 With Chrome Extensions

    Victoria, B.C. -- The founders of Shift are turning heads, and this time with more than just Gmail customers. Shift 2.0 offers support for both Boomerang & Grammarly Chrome Extensions, making Redbrick’s Shift only the second major commercial application to successfully integrate Chrome Extensions within Brave’s Muon framework.   

     

    Shift was originally built on a framework called Electron, and became an instant hit - and top Product Hunt launch - when it became publicly available back in December of last year.  Their user base has grown to over 65,000 quickly since, with Gmail users flocking to Shift to manage multiple accounts, across Mail, Calendar and Drive. For its Shift 2.0 launch, Redbrick has used the Brave Muon framework to build out support for the most anticipated Chrome Extensions - Boomerang and Grammarly.  

     

    “With Chrome Extension support being the single most requested feature right out of the gate, we quickly realized that rebasing Shift to Brave’s more flexible Muon framework was a very necessary - albeit challenging - next step that we wanted to tackle full-on. We were thrilled that the team at Brave helped us navigate the Muon process from start to finish, and document it carefully for the rest of the open-source community.  The support over the last few months has been truly remarkable, and we are thrilled to share our findings with other developers seeking to add support for Chrome Extensions,” said Director of Product, Michael Foucher.

     

    Brave Muon is a fork of the Electron framework that leverages the full power of Chromium, including extensions support. It is currently used in the Brave browser and available to developers on GitHub as part of Brave's open source platform. The Muon framework is helping Redbrick provide the support and features their users want.

     

    Shift’s Advanced plan is the true game-changer for 2.0, offering support for Boomerang and Grammarly, as well as the much anticipated Unified Search, which allows customers to search through multiple accounts, Calendar, and Drive, from one search field. It also provides support for other popular applications, like Slack, Asana, Jira, Trello, and over twenty other essential tools. With customizable Notification Muting, which syncs with Google Calendar, users can even stop embarrassing notifications from popping up during meetings.

     

    Shift is still available as a free version, as well as Pro for $29.99 per year. The newest plan, Advanced, has a yearly fee of $99.99. All plans offer support for multi-account access; a clean, clutter-free desktop application; easy switching between Mail, Calendar, and Drive; native desktop notifications; and cross-platform support for Windows, Mac, and Linux.  

     

    In addition to Shift, Redbrick prides itself on a respected portfolio of B2B offerings focused on user engagement and analytics technology.

     

    Redbrick was ranked 2nd fastest-growing  Canadian software company in the 28th annual PROFIT 500, and 5th overall in 2016. The company is known for building powerful software products for engaged users, globally, and Shift 2.0 is no exception.

     

    Shift 2.0 is now available to the public as of November 1, 2017. For those interested in testing out Shift for free, they can access it here.

     

    For more information about this story, contact:

     

    Nadia Tatlow, Marketing

    Redbrick
    nadia.tatlow@rdbrck.com

    +1 (250) 216-0019

    https://rdbrck.com/

     

     

     

     

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    The Victoria Hand Project started using 3-D printers to build low-cost customized prosthetic hands.. see more

    Source: Vancouver Sun

    B.C. non-profit's affordable 3-D printed prosthetics in the running for $750,000 prize

    [Vote for them here!]

    A B.C. non-profit society that makes three dimensional printed prosthetics for amputees in developing countries is one of the finalists for a Google grant worth $750,000. 

    The Victoria Hand Project started using 3-D printers to build low-cost customized prosthetic hands less than three years ago. Since then, it has fitted 70 people in Nepal, Guatemala, Ecuador, Haiti, Cambodia and Egypt who would otherwise go without. The project operates out of a biomedical design lab at the University of Victoria.

    “If we win, we can expand into at least five new countries, and we can build hands for 750 people free of charge to them,” said Michael Peirone, a project designer and recent biomedical engineering grad. “Getting picked out of hundreds of projects in Canada, and by a company like Google, it’s pretty exciting.” 

    The prosthesis was designed in the 1990s by University of Victoria professor Dr. Nikolai Dechev when he was still a master’s student at the University of Toronto. It languished on a shelf for close to two decades because it was too expensive to produce. Then, in 2013, a mechanical engineering student named Josh Coutts came up with the idea of using 3-D printers to build the device. 

    The Victoria Hand Project partners with clinics in impoverished communities to set up a print centre with a 3-D printer, a 3-D scanner, and other supplies and equipment. It trains local technicians to use the machines, which print out a custom socket and prosthetic made of a bioplastic called PLA, or polylactic acid. The hand has an adaptive grasp and movable thumb and is activated by a shoulder harness. 

    The cost, which includes prosthetists and technicians, is about $300, a fraction of the usual $2,000 to $3,000 cost of a conventional prosthetic. Peirone, who has travelled to Ecuador and Nepal to set up the program, has witnessed first-hand the impact the prosthetics can have on people’s lives. 

    “In some countries, if people are missing a limb, they are ostracized from society or can’t get a job,” said Peirone. “After we give them a hand, they’re able to get a job. We have people using a pen and writing on a piece of paper again. 

    “When we work with patients and they say ‘thank you’ and their lives have changed, that’s what we do this for.” 

    The Victoria Hand Project is one of 10 finalists for the Google Impact Challenge, which will award $5 million to 10 non-profits. Judges will choose four organizations and the public will vote for one organization that will receive $750,000. Voting goes until March 28. The winners will be announced March 30 in Toronto. 

    [Vote for them here!]