Jobs

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Victoria added 1,000 tech jobs to the labour force between 2012 and 2017 see more

    Source: Goldstream Gazette
    Author: Keri Coles

    Victoria named in top 10 Canadian cities for tech talent

    First time B.C.’s capital has made the list

    Victoria now ranks in the top ten cities for Canadian tech talent, according to a new report released Thursday by CBRE Canada.

    It is the first time B.C.’s capital has made the list, which analyzes the conditions, cost and quality of the labour market for highly-skilled tech workers. The rapid growth of Victoria’s tech sector and its momentum is being credited for the ranking boost.

    The 2018 Scoring Canadian Tech Talent Report, published by real estate company CBRE, notes that Victoria added 1,000 tech jobs to the labour force between 2012 and 2017 – a 16.1 per cent increase.

    While Victoria was ranked number 10, its overall score of 46.4 was almost half that of the city at the top of the list – Toronto at 87.3.

    The analysis was broken down into three indicators – tech talent employment, educational attainment and high-tech industry. Victoria was ranked 14, 10 and 6, respectively, out of the 20 cities analyzed.

    Victoria’s SaaS (Software as a Service) and high-tech manufacturing industries pushed its high-tech concentration to 3.6 per cent, well above the national average of 2.6 per cent.

    Tech is noted as one of the fastest growing industries in Greater Victoria, with a 48.3 per cent growth in high-tech industry from 2012 to 2017 and an estimated economic impact of $5.2 billion, according to Statistics Canada data.

    The report says the primary tech industries in Victoria are SaaS, ocean science, and advanced manufacturing.

    Early this year, B.C.-led Digital Technology Supercluster, of which Victoria is a part, was chosen as one of the funding recipients for the Government of Canada’s Innovation Supercluster Initiative, created to facilitate and fund collaborative technology projects.

    It is expected to boost GDP in B.C. by more than $5 billion and create more than 13,500 jobs over the next 10 years.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    As a female developer these are some things I want in a company before I decide to join see more

    Source: Code.LikeaGirl.io
    Author: Leigha Mitchell

    I’m a woman in tech, and this is what I want in a company

    As a female developer these are some things I want in a company before I decide to join, and once I’m a part of the team.

    I want to see other women

    The first thing most people do before interviewing or even applying for a job is look at the company careers page. If it’s plastered with pictures of white guys in flannel with beards, that’s a red flag. If the exec team is all white men who look like they could be my father that’s another one. When you’re a small team and those are the cards you’re dealt, it’s harder to get around that. But you can always put a statement on this page explaining the fact you want to diversify your team and why. Another trick I’ve seen is having a clearly female silhouette saying “This could be you!”.

    Once I’ve made it past the careers page, I want to see them in person. It’s always important to have women in the interview process, but especially when the candidate is also a woman. This makes me feel more comfortable with asking certain questions, and offers an opportunity to ask things only another woman in tech could answer. Even if there aren’t currently women on the team I’d be joining (red flag) bring someone from another team in for a culture interview.

    I don’t give a shit about your “amazing culture”

    Everyone has great culture and you’re all best friends, I get it. This is so common in startup land that it’s meaningless. I’ve worked at these places, and I promise you what is an amazing culture for one person can be horrible for another. I want you to prove it. I want to meet members from every team, I want to chat with them and get to know what they’re like. It’s important for me to know that these are people I’m going to work well and grow with, and that they want to do those things with me.

    “Many of the truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view.”
    – Obi Wan Kenobi

    I don’t care that you have a ping-pong table, or a keg, or free snacks. I care that the CEO leaves on time to pick up her kids during the week, that the holidays are for spending time with your family, and that when the guy in marketing got engaged to his boyfriend everyone went out for lunch to celebrate. Those are the things I want to see, and the team I want to be a part of.

    Tell me how you’re going to help me grow

    The moment I get stagnant, I get bored and I move on. That is a huge factor in why I became a developer in the first place. There’s always something new to learn, or practice, or build. This means growth and projection are extremely important to me and I’ve learned the hard way to make sure that is clear from the beginning.

    I, like a lot of other women, am very passive when it comes to asking for raises or promotions. Having an outline of expectations for each level of developer helps with this. Now I have a guideline and I know exactly what I need to do to meet those expectations. It also helps reduce the opportunity for discrimination. Everyone knows what is expected for each level, and for each salary. You either meet the requirements, or you keep working at things until you do.

    I should forget that I’m a minority, but be supported when I remember

    It should never be painfully obvious that I’m the only woman in the room. In an ideal world I won’t be, but sometimes that is still the case. We are adults and everyone should be treated with respect and equally, but that is a whole other conversation. It’s great to have a CEO or a few advocates in the company who support diversity, but if it’s not a part of every employee’s mentality it won’t happen.

    If I bring something to the attention of a manager or member of the exec team, like concerns about lack of diversity or the treatment of women in tech, it should be taken seriously. If it’s within the company their help is crucial, but if it is a more broad concern I want to know that I have their support. If I tell them I want more women to get into tech I want them to say “So what are you going to do about it?” and know that they will push and support me.

    Help me fight my imposter syndrome

    Everyone knows about Imposter Syndrome these days and it’s something I suffer from. Especially as a woman in tech, and extra especially as a more junior developer. I’m incredibly hard on myself so it helps to have a team that will have my back in the fight. I don’t mean that I want to be told how awesome I am, I want real advice. I want to know that my mentors started out where I did, I need to be told to step back and look at the big picture and not the day to day.

    “The dark side clouds everything. Impossible to see the future is.”
    – Yoda

    That being said, it is also beneficial to be on a team that will tell other peoplehow awesome you are. A lot of people don’t like to brag or bring attention to their accomplishments, that’s why you need to do it for them. Seeing others be supportive of their team mates and brag about other’s accomplishments is a powerful thing. That is an environment you can’t fake, and everyone deserves to be a part of.


    I’ve been lucky enough to find a company like this, but for those still looking this is what I would expect and demand. For companies looking to hire more women and diversify your teams, I hope you learned something.


  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    If you want a job in Greater Victoria, there is likely one waiting for you. see more

    Source: CHEK News

    As Greater Victoria businesses struggle to fill jobs, some are cutting hours

    WATCH: If you want a job in Greater Victoria, there is likely one waiting for you. The unemployment rate in Victoria is the fourth lowest in Canada, and the lowest in B.C. But as Mary Griffin reports, businesses are struggling to find workers.


    On a sunny afternoon, a note on the coffee shop door at Victoria’s Fisherman’s Wharf goes unnoticed by most going inside.

    But they are outside soon when they find out the shop is closed.

    The cafe at Victoria’s Fisherman’s Wharf is experiencing a shortage of workers. So it now closes hours earlier than usual.

    Tourist Glen Rabuka was sitting outside Friday, sharing a coffee because he didn’t know the shop was closing early.

    The coffee is good, and there is no one to serve it, I guess. And that is so unfortunate,” Rabuka said.

    The economy in Greater Victoria is booming and that contributes to a worker shortage, according to Frank Bourree, principal of Chemistry Consulting of Victoria, a business and human resource consulting firm.

    “We’ve been involved in employment business for about 25 years, here, and we’ve never seen it this severe in terms of shortages,” Bourree said.

    He believes that the region is facing an employment crisis.

    “It’s pretty much across all sectors. We’re seeing a lot of competition now between sectors for higher, and higher wages. So, people are leaving the tourism industry, and going to high-tech, or construction for higher wages often,” Bourree said.

    Victoria’s unemployment rate of 4.2 percent, lower than Vancouver’s, and significantly lower than the national unemployment rate of six percent is the lowest in the province.

    That translates into difficulties for employers.

    “This is a structural problem. We’ve got a demographic challenge. We don’t have enough kids coming into the system. We’re not getting the migration, as I said, for a number of reasons. And we’re not getting enough immigration to this region. And that’s really the only solution to our labour shortage problem,” Bourree said.

    According to Statistics Canada, the construction industry created 5,900 jobs from January 2017 to January 2018.

    Another 2,900 in retail, and wholesale jobs. 2,400 jobs in finance-related positions, and 2,700 more jobs in education.

    But the high cost of housing, transportation and childcare are challenges for workers and the companies that are cutting hours due to a lack of employees.

    Outside the coffee shop, tourist George Sears says something is wrong when a business has to close in the middle of the day to deal with a staffing shortage.

    “It’s a real twist, isn’t it?  People want to be here.  Visit here. And so, to not have a facility open after three p.m., or it’s two o’clock, isn’t it?  It’s hard on the business,” Sears said.

    Del Staveley is a tourist who intended on enjoying an afternoon coffee but was turned away.

    “I think it’s unfortunate that the cost of living, the cost of getting a place to live is preventing people from getting jobs. Which is what it is,” Staveley said.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    VIATEC puts their FREE tech expo on at the Crystal Garden Feb 23, 2018 from 11am to 6pm see more

    DISCOVER TECTORIA TO SHOW OFF LOCAL TECH WITH ONE-DAY EXPO

    VIATEC puts their FREE tech expo on at the Crystal Garden Feb 23, 2018 from 11am to 6pm

    Victoria, BC (February 22, 2018) - Discover Tectoria is the Island's BIGGEST Tech Expo and it’s taking over the Crystal Garden from 11am to 6pm on February 23rd. This year’s showcase features 76 booths over two floors, a great lineup of panel discussions, science demos for kids, VR experiences, a “Jam Hut”, samples from Victoria Beer Week, the Spirit of Tomorrow car and more. The expo, organized by VIATEC (Victoria Innovation, Advanced Technology & Entrepreneurship Council), will feature a:
     

    • Main floor Tradeshow
      (local companies demonstrating products, hiring talent and co-op students)

    • The Creativity Hub, sponsored by BC Public Service Agency
      (A collection of interactive tech displays, showcasing our city's most excellent creativity)

    • Startup Alley, sponsored by Work BC
      (get a sneak peek at the future of Tectoria)

    • The UVic Research District
      (see some amazing projects post-secondary students have put together)

    • The Innovation Theatre, sponsored by TD Canada Trust
      (a line-up of great talks and panel discussions - schedule TBA soon!)

    • The Combustion Chamber
      (Science Venture LIVE demos for the kids!)

    • Partner Row, sponsored by Royal Roads University
      (a group of incredibly useful organizations that serve businesses and the community).

    VIATEC is once again taking full advantage of the tri-district Pro-D Day scheduled on the same day and is encouraging parents to bring their kids to enjoy a full day of exploration.

    Youth get a glimpse into a future working in tech, post-secondary students and job seekers get to meet potential employers, local and visiting investors can check out some up-and-coming businesses, and tech companies get to showcase their products and services to thousands of attendees.

    “We created this event in 2003 to showcase the innovation taking place right here in Victoria,” explains Dan Gunn, CEO of VIATEC. “Discover Tectoria gives our local tech companies a platform where they can be seen and heard by investors, media, job seekers and youth. We are aiming to draw out 4,000 attendees, many of which will make up the leaders and vital team members of our community in the immediate and near future. There’s no better way to inspire our future tech workers than filling a space with all the opportunities, creative minds and unworldly inventions.”

    Simultaneously, VIATEC, the City of Victoria, the Capital Investment Network and NACO are hosting the Western Regional Angel Summit for a contingent of visiting angel and VC investors which kicked off on February 21 and runs until the February 23. Invitees are experiencing first-hand the city’s highly sought after quality of life, including how easy it is to travel to and from Victoria, the vibrancy of our innovative business community and the depth of our local deal flow. The trip will finish with a visit to Discover Tectoria.

    For the full Program and Exhibitor Map, click here.

    [Exhibitor Directory 2018]

    [2017 Video Recap]

    [2017 Photo Gallery]


    MEDIA CONTACT:

    Dan Gunn
    CEO, VIATEC
    dgunn@viatec.ca
    250-882-2820

     

    www.DiscoverTectoria.com


    ABOUT VIATEC:

    VIATEC (Victoria Innovation, Advanced Technology and Entrepreneurship Council), started in 1989. Our mission is to serve as the one-stop hub that connects people, knowledge and resources to grow and promote the Greater Victoria technology sector (Victoria's biggest industry).

    We work closely with our members to offer a variety of events, programs and services. In addition, VIATEC serves as the front door of the local tech sector and as its spokesperson. To better support local innovators, we acquired our own building (Fort Tectoria) where we offer flexible and affordable office space to emerging local companies along with a gathering/event space for local entrepreneurs. www.viatec.ca

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    “To find skilled and experienced talent has been difficult and it’s probably the biggest thing... see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    Greater Victoria struggles to fill jobs

    Greater Victoria is facing an employment “crisis” and it will take a multi-pronged attack to deal with it, according to a human resources consultant.

    Statistics Canada reported the country had an unemployment rate of 5.7 per cent — a 40-year low — in December and that Victoria now has the second-lowest unemployment rate in the country at 3.4 per cent.

    Frank Bourree, principal of Chemistry Consulting in Victoria, said inaction is not an option as businesses scramble to attract workers.

    “This can only be solved through immigration, workforce housing and better transportation and daycare, or it’s only going to get worse, because I don’t see the economy going south anytime soon,” said Bourree.

    His firm oversees Work B.C.’s employment centres.

    “It is a crisis. We have been tracking this for the last six years and our caseloads have been dropping dramatically, and they took a real dip last year.”

    Bourree said a booming economy that has raised most sectors and a shift in demographics as Baby Boomers continue to leave the workforce has played a role in exacerbating the problem of finding workers.

    “And in each of the sectors, we are not getting migration from other provinces anymore because they are doing well,” Bourree said. He noted that potential workers are also put off by the cost of housing in Victoria, as well as barriers such as lack of childcare spaces and overburdened transportation infrastructure. “Here, the workforce is in the West Shore and the work is downtown.”

    The biggest issue, however, is that immigration has not kept pace with the shrinking workforce, said Bourree, noting some effort has been made to open the gates. “It’s now easier to bring skilled workers, but harder to bring in two-year temporary foreign workers and to be honest, that’s what we need.”

    Victoria’s 3.4 per cent unemployment rate represents a slight change from the 3.3 per cent recorded in November, and is well off the 5.0 noted in December 2016. According Statistics Canada, the total number of people employed in Victoria increased to 193,300 in December, up from 186,600 in December 2016, while the Greater Victoria labour force grew to 200,100 from 196,500 the year before.

    While the unemployment rate is very low, it’s still well off the lowest Victoria has seen. In May 2008, the rate hit 2.8 per cent.

    “I would say [the lack of skilled workers] isn’t a 2017 or 2018 problem, but it’s been an ongoing challenge for the growing tech companies in Victoria,” said Dan Gunn, chief executive of the Victoria Innovation, Advanced Technology and Entrepreneurship Council. “To find skilled and experienced talent has been difficult and it’s probably the biggest thing holding back growth.”

    Gunn said while the city — and tech sector in particular — has never focused as much attention on the problem as now, it still has to compete with a strong national economy that demands workers.

    Locally, the tech sector has seen steady demand for workers. The VIATEC job board has posted more than 1,100 jobs over the last year and has consistently had about 100 jobs on its board each month. “When the economy was overheating in 2007, we saw between 140 and 170 jobs, and we don’t want to see that again, so we have to keep working to attract more people,” Gunn said.

    Statistics Canada’s survey found that the biggest gains over the last year were seen in retail and wholesale trade, which boasted 26,500 jobs in December, up from 24,000 the year previous. The finance, insurance and real estate sector added 2,300 new positions and the accommodation and food-services sector added 3,500 positions.

    Those gains were offset by a decline in the business, building and support-services sector, shedding 4,600 positions since December 2016, and information, culture and recreation sector, losing 2,000 positions.

    Canada’s low unemployment rate was due to 13 straight months of job creation, but it has economists warning it could push the Bank of Canada to raise its key overnight interest rate by 25 basis points later this month to 1.25 per cent.

    Statistics Canada reported the largest employment gains in December were observed in Quebec and Alberta, with the former adding 27,000 jobs for a 4.9 per cent unemployment rate and the latter generating 26,000 jobs for a rate of 6.9 per cent.

    B.C. closed out the year with an employment growth rate of 3.4 per cent, with 83,000 additional jobs, with almost all of the gains in full-time jobs.

    In the 12 months to December, the unemployment rate in B.C. fell by 1.2 percentage points to 4.6 per cent, the lowest among all provinces.

    Job-creation numbers follow Canadian economic signals that have been positive for some time, said TD Economics senior economist Brian DePratto.

    “If you go back and look at the economic growth figures Canada was putting out late last year, early this year, we saw very, very robust growth across effectively all sectors of the economy,” he said. “I think to some extent we’re seeing catch-up activity from the output of the economy on the employment side.”

    Matthew Stewart, director of national forecast for the Conference Board of Canada, said he is concerned about a tight labour market going forward but added business should be pleased with wage increases shown by the statistics. “Slower, more sustainable job growth is in store for the year ahead,” he said in a statement.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    The increased interest provides an opportunity for Canada to harness some serious talent see more

    Source: Times Colonist

    U.S. tech workers more likely to job hunt in Canada, study shows

    VANCOUVER — A new study shows U.S. technology sector workers are more likely than those in other industries to job hunt north of the border, and have increasingly been doing so after Donald Trump secured the presidency and assumed office.

    "I think it's potentially a really big opportunity for Canada over the next couple of years," said Daniel Culbertson, an economist with Indeed, the job search site that produced the report.

    The company's search data shows the average American looking for work on their site in a foreign country clicks on Canadian job listings for roughly 12 per cent of their total search.

    For tech workers, the company says, that figure jumped to nearly 30 per cent for the six months ending May 2017. That's up about seven per cent from the same time last year.

    The prospective employees gravitate to Ottawa, Toronto, Kitchener-Waterloo, Vancouver and Montreal.

    The only place they're looking more frequently is India, which netted nearly 40 per cent of clicks, said Culbertson. After Canada, there's "a pretty big drop off," he said, with almost eight per cent of clicks going to jobs in the U.K.

    American tech workers' growing interest in Canada is significant, said Culbertson, and likely due to Canada's strong economy and America's controversial president causing some tech industry insiders to at least entertain a move to the Great White North.

    Searches spiked near the U.S. presidential election Nov. 8 and Trump's inauguration Jan. 20, the company's data shows.

    While that interest fades as time moves farther past those high-profile dates, Culbertson said the political drama out of the White House continues to stay in some job seekers' minds.

    The increased interest provides an opportunity for Canada to harness some serious talent, he said, as the prospective employees are seeking jobs that require high skills, like senior software engineer, or specialized abilities, like cloud engineer.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    RingPartner, a digital marketing company, requires employees to work in the office from 10am-3pm... see more

    Source: Firenewsfeed and CTV Vancouver

    Victoria tech company hopes to entice new talent with five-hour work days

    A Victoria technology company has switched to five-hour work days in an effort to attract new employees.

    A boom in the tech industry has meant that companies have had to offer more than a unique workplace and cutting edge perks to draw in potential new talent.

    RingPartner, a digital marketing company, requires employees to work in the office from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with any remaining work to be done where and when they choose.

    According to Katie Hoffman, the risk manager for the company, the shorter hours and later start time make work the least hectic part of her day, as the mother of four children between the ages of one and seven.

    “(Before) I had two minutes to get dressed, grab my lunch if I remembered it and then I would get to work and brush my teeth,” Hoffman told CTV Vancouver.

    Hoffman also said core work hours have been like a “gift” and something others have showed an interest in.

    Not only is RingPartner attracting new talent, but core work hours have shown their value in improved results, according to the CEO, Mike Williams.

    “It’s really about the value and the results that they can drive rather than the time that you put into the office,” said Williams.

    The boom in the industry is in part due to larger companies such as Amazon and Microsoft moving into the province, but also an increase in demand for tech workers in nearly every industry.

    According to the B.C. Tech Association, companies will have to get even more creative, as they estimate by 2021 that there could be close to 30,000 unfilled positions.

    With a report from CTV Vancouver’s Bhinder Sajan