Prototype Equipment Design

  • Article
    Check out the ‘Caboost,’ an out-of-the-bike electric motor! see more

    For Simon Park, it was the hills.

    The fourth-year mechanical engineering student (with a business minor) at the University of Victoria took it upon himself to ride his bike to classes last year as part of his commitment to a sustainable lifestyle. From the Christmas Hill neighbourhood, he needed only to make his way to the McKenzie bike lane and enjoy an easy bike commute to UVic. That said, he’s no pro cyclist, and after one day he was seeking a solution to the tiring and sweat-inducing hills along the way.

    “Right away I looked into electric bicycles but they are really expensive,” Park said.

    Instead, the mechanically inclined 21-year-old built his own solution. He mounted a small motor and battery frame, well, part of a frame, that was rescued from a discarded kids bike. It bolts on like a set of adult training wheels. Park also wired a throttle to the handlebar that trails back to the motor.

    He calls it the “Caboost,” and he hopes to one day sell them for under $500.

    On Sunday, Park is one of 10 finalists who will pitch their projects to a panel of judges at the Smart South Island Open Innovation Challenge. The top three winners will win a $15,000 investment towards their project.

    “It’s easy to say we should use [alternative transportation] instead of driving but it has to be easier,” Park said. “Not everyone is ready to get dressed in spandex and break a sweat.”

    Park describes the Caboost as an outside-of-the-bike invention, since the new wave of electric-assist bicycles come with internal motors and batteries, while after-market electric-assist kits are mounted somewhere on the frame.

    Electric-assisted bicycles are expensive, and so are the after-market kits.

    Keen to take his Caboost as far as he can, Park has already found $2,800 in support – $2,500 from the Wighton Engineering Product Development Fund and another $300 from the recent UVic Pitchit innovation contest.

    Sunday’s Open Innovation Challenge runs from 2 to 5 p.m. at Flury Hall in the Bob Wright Building of UVic. Nearby parking is free that afternoon.

    If Park earns the $15,000 grant he will take the prototype to the next stage.

    “I’d like to move from the prototype stage to the design and development stage, to create a small number of these for beta testing, and to partner with local bike shops to sell them off shelf.”

     

    Source: https://www.saanichnews.com/news/check-out-the-caboost-an-out-of-the-bike-electric-motor/

  • Clive Gorman posted an article
    Victoria high school robotics team sponsored by local tech companies take top honours. see more

     

    Local Victoria high school students were honoured with two prestigious awards ahead of more than 1,200 international students at the FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) robotics contest in Houston, Texas last week.

    The team is sponsored by local Victoria tech companies and organizations; Codename Entertainment, Actuonix, Prototype Equipment Design, and Makerspace have donated money, space, or materials, to the team as part of their ongoing support and advocacy for growing the tech industry both locally and for Canada.

    Team member, Aila Simpson, was selected for the 'Dean's List' award, the first time that a Canadian FTC student was chosen for the honour in the seven-year history of the award.

    The team also won the Inspire Award, the highest FTC award that recognises excellence in robot design and teamwork.

    The FIRST Tech Challenge International Championships was held in Houston, Texas in the United States on April 19-22, 2017. FIRST Tech Challenge teams (up to 15 members, grades 7-12) are challenged to design, build, program, and operate robots to compete in a head-to-head challenge in an alliance format.

    FIRST Founder Dean Kamen said: “It is critical to develop more kids with the toolset, the vision and the ability to work together to deal with difficult problems. At FIRST, we inspire enthusiastic young people to learn, work hard and one day – change the world."

    About Team FIX IT 3491

    Team FIX IT 3491 are five local students that attend Mount Douglas Secondary School, Victoria High, Pacific School of Innovation and Inquiry, and one home learning student. The Victoria team is one of only three teams from Canada out of the 120 international teams.

    The team coach is Christine Nicholls, a local member of FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) non-profit organisation, a role she has performed for the last ten years.

    The team is sponsored by local Victoria tech companies and organizations; Codename Entertainment, Actuonix, Prototype Equipment Design, and Makerspace have donated money, space, or materials, to the team as part of their ongoing support and advocacy for growing the tech industry both locally and for Canada.

    About FIRST Tech Challenge World Championship

    FIRST Tech Challenge teams (up to 15 members, grades 7-12) are challenged to design, build, program, and operate robots to compete in a head-to-head challenge in an alliance format.

    The Championships is also an opportunity to showcase talent to attending recruiters from leading colleges and universities, including MIT and Yale University. All participants have the option to apply for $50 million in scholarships from colleges and universities around the world.