workers

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Greater Victoria has the lowest unemployment rate in Canada at 3.8%, a level last seen in 2008 see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Carla Wilson

    Greater Victoria leads Canada with lowest unemployment rate

    Greater Victoria has the lowest unemployment rate in Canada at 3.8 per cent, a level last seen here in 2008.

    The number of people working full-time in the capital region moved to 143,400 in March, up from 137,900 in the same month in 2016, Statistics Canada said on Friday. Part-time employment climbed to 46,200 from 41,500 over the same period.

    Employers are turning out in force at job fairs in the hopes of hiring workers in sectors ranging from hospitality and technology to construction. The Canadian Coast Guard recently announced a hiring blitz and is using social media to attract staff while a tourism job fair attracted a healthy crowd last weekend at Ogden Point ahead of what is expected to be a record season for visitors.

    Greater Victoria’s unemployment rate tightened up from 4.4 per cent in February, Statistics Canada said in its monthly labour report.

    Quebec City is in second place nationally at 4.1 per cent, with a third-place tie between Vancouver and Brantford, Ont., at 4.7 per cent.

    With an election approaching on May 9, B.C. is holding onto its status as the province with the lowest unemployment rate in Canada. That’s despite the fact it moved to 5.4 per cent in March from 5.1 per cent in February.

    “B.C.’s labour market maintained a positive trend through March, but showed mild signs of deceleration with slower employment growth and a slight uplift in the unemployment rate,” said Brian Yu, deputy chief economist at Central 1 Credit Union.

    Total provincial employment rose by 0.2 per cent from February. The medium trend forecast “still points to a strong pace of hiring in B.C.,” Yu said.

    Greater Victoria’s unemployment rate was last at 3.8 per cent at the end of 2008 when the global financial crisis exploded. The region’s rate had been even lower, at 2.8 per cent, in May of that year, but it began climbing as the recession set in.

    Another bright spot in Greater Victoria was the increase in youth (15 to 24 years) employment as numbers rose to 31,100 last month, from 26,200 the year before.

    Employment in the age 25-to-54 group climbed to 119,000 from 112,900 year-over-year.

    There was a slight drop in the 55-year-old plus category with 38,700 working last month, down from 40,300 a year ago.

    Phil Venoit, president of the Vancouver Island and District office of B.C. Building Trades, said the construction sector is becoming stronger all the time. “Things are starting to ramp up around the city, so it is positive,” he said, pointing to major office and multi-family projects that are going up. He is looking forward to the jobs created by the upcoming $765-million sewage treatment plant.

    Employment in the capital region’s construction sector rose to 15,600 in March, from 12,100 the same month a year ago — an increase of 28 per cent, a Statistics Canada official said.

    Building permits in Greater Victoria in February fell by 37.2 per cent to $77.8 million from 124.7 million in Feb. 2016. However, those figures reflect only what happens in one month, not the overall construction activity underway in a particular region.

    Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing experienced a 33 per cent leap in jobs year-over-year to 10,400 from 7,800. Public administration jobs climbed by 26 per cent to 20,800 from 16,500. Business, building and other support services also saw a 26 per cent boost, to 9,600 last month from 7,400.

    There were few job categories with major losses. Education dropped by 17 per cent to 12,800 in March, down from 15,400 the same month in 2016.

    Greater Victoria’s technology sector has been performing well, although job numbers slipped somewhat year-over-year to 18,100 from 19,600.

    The nation’s labour market stayed hot last month, pumping out another 19,400 net jobs — and the vast majority of the new work was full-time, Statistics Canada said.

    CANADA

    A quick look at March employment (previous month in parentheses):

    Unemployment rate 6.7% (6.6)

    Employment rate 61.5% (61.4)

    Labour force participation rate 65.9% (65.8)

    Number unemployed 1,313,700 (1,286,100)

    Number working 18,308,000 (18,288,600)

    Youth (15-24) unemployment 12.8% (12.4)

    Men (25 plus) unemployment 6.0% (5.9)

    Women (25 plus) unemployment 5.4% (5.2)

    PROVINCIAL UNEMPLOYMENT

    Newfoundland 14.9% (14.2)

    Prince Edward Island 10.1 (10.0)

    Nova Scotia 8.6 (8.1)

    New Brunswick 8.4 (8.9)

    Quebec 6.4 (6.4)

    Ontario 6.4 (6.2)

    Manitoba 5.5 (5.8)

    Saskatchewan 6.0 (6.0)

    Alberta 8.4 (8.3)

    British Columbia 5.4 (5.1)

    CITY UNEMPLOYMENT

    St. John’s, N.L. 8.9% (9.1)

    Halifax 6.5 (6.1)

    Moncton, N.B. 8.0 (8.2)

    Saint John, N.B. 6.7 (7.9)

    Quebec 4.1 (4.3)

    Trois-Rivieres, Que. 6.6 (6.6)

    Montreal 6.6 (6.7)

    Ottawa 5.0 (5.1)

    Kingston, Ont. 6.1 (6.1)

    Oshawa, Ont. 6.0 (5.7)

    Toronto 7.1 (7.1)

    Hamilton, Ont. 5.9 (5.9)

    Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont. 5.6 (5.5)

    Brantford, Ont. 4.7 (4.2)

    London, Ont. 6.0 (6.2)

    Windsor, Ont. 5.2 (5.1)

    Barrie, Ont. 6.8 (7.2)

    Sudbury, Ont. 7.4 (7.9)

    Thunder Bay, Ont. 5.8 (6.0)

    Winnipeg 6.5 (6.7)

    Regina 4.8 (5.2)

    Saskatoon 7.5 (7.0)

    Calgary 9.3 (9.4)

    Edmonton 8.4 (8.3)

    Kelowna 6.4 (7.4)

    Abbotsford 6.3 (6.1)

    Vancouver 4.7 (4.7)

    Victoria 3.8 (4.4)

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Technology now typically employs more people than mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined see more

    Source: Quartz
    Author: Nevin Thompson

    Brexit and Trump could be good news for Canada’s tech scene

    By 2019, it’s estimated there will be 182,000 job openings in Canada’s tech sector—and no Canadians to fill them. Better-known for maple syrup, snow-capped mountains, and head-of-state heartthrob Justin Trudeau, Canada is also home to a vibrant tech sector that is crying out for workers. And Donald Trump’s unlikely presidency may already be helping Canadian tech firms fill those spots.

    On the night of Nov. 8, as many Americans realized that Trump was going to be elected president of the United States of America, a flood of hundreds of thousands of visitors crashed Canada’s immigration website. People were presumably looking for ways to relocate to Canada and escape whatever Trump has in store for the four years ahead.

    But in fact, Americans accounted for just half of the surge in visits to the immigration website—visitors from other parts of the world made up the other half. But why?

    Options for foreign workers looking to emigrate are narrowing. June’s Brexit decision in Britain was based in on a desire to tighten the UK’s border and restrict its flow of immigrants. Indeed, the future of the European Union, the world’s largest trade zone, is in question as anti-immigrant, right-wing parties in the Netherlands and in France seem poised for victory in 2017. In the US, on top of vowing to build a wall with Mexico and deport immigrants, Trump has promised to clamp down on the H-1B visas that bring 85,000 skilled international workersinto America each year.

    Meanwhile, across Canada, 71,000 tech companies are responsible for over 7% of Canada’s economic output and 5.6% of Canada’s total employment: Technology now typically employs more people than mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined. Canada, with its reputation for tolerance and openness to diversity and immigration, has been called one of the world’s last “safe harbors.” Add an almost unlimited demand for skilled workers across the country, and it’s easy to see why Canada could become the next hub for the globe-trotting workforce.

    “Donald Trump has definitely been a topic of conversation here in Seattle,” says Dan Gunn, chief executive officer of VIATEC, a Canada-based community organization and 16,000 square-foot technology accelerator. In the days following the US election, Gunn was spending time in Seattle for Startup Week. “There are questions about what Trump means for tech and for tech workers in the States. Highly skilled workers from around the world, particularly visible or religious minorities who had their sights set on moving to the US, might look to Canada for opportunities instead.”

    As head of VIATEC, Gunn helped build a thriving technology sector in Victoria—a small Canadian city of about 350,000 people located on an island just to the north of Seattle. Once known mainly as a sleepy government town and destination for retirees and tourists, Victoria is now home to a thriving tech scene that has attracted everyone from global giants like Amazon and Schneider Electric to game developers such as Kixeye and a Change.org satellite office.

    Just like the rest of the Canadian technology sector, Victoria—nicknamed “Tectoria”—has plenty of job openings. “Canada is growing, a thriving innovation sector, and advanced technology has become the number-one industry in Victoria,” Gunn says. “Nearly 900 companies employ over 23,000 people here. And they’re always hiring.”

    Across Canada, the need for workers is currently so great that a number of employers and industry organizations have banded together with the Canadian government to launch Go North Canada. The initiative is an attempt first and foremost to lure some of the more than 350,000 Canadians who work in Silicon Valley (as well as Canadians in other parts of the US) back home.

    “Canadian companies are currently looking to fill three different kinds, of roles: technical talent, experienced sales and marketing talent, and people in leadership roles who have experience scaling up companies,” says Heather Galt, vice president for human resources at Communitech, an Ontario technology-startup hub, who is helping promote the Go North Campaign across Canada. Galt says that Canada can often offer a better quality of life compared to working in the US: It has better schools, lower commute times, and a stunning natural environment.

    The Trudeau government has also announced a new strategy to make it easier for companies to recruit foreign tech talent. Compared to the H-1B visa process in the US, which can take about six months to set up, it normally takes nine months or more for foreign tech workers to receive a Canadian work visa.

    “Dealing with red tape is the number-one obstacle to bringing foreign talent to Canada,” says Noah Warder. Warder leads operations at Sendwithus, a Victoria-based startup that builds tools for email marketing. “It’s much easier to bring Canadians north of the border,” he says.

    While it’s still too early to determine whether or not Justin Trudeau’s new immigration strategy will make it easier to recruit foreign workers, the prospect of Canada’s attractive tech scene—not to mention its equally attractive outdoor wonderland—should give many foreign workers something to dream about.

    You can follow Nevin on Twitter at @Nevin_Thompson. Learn how to write for Quartz Ideas. We welcome your comments at ideas@qz.com.