talent

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Introducing: BC JobConnect. see more

    New Tool Brings Together BC Employers with Qualified Individuals New to Canada

    Introducing: BC JobConnect. This tool brings together BC employers who are seeking qualified individuals to fill specific roles with newcomers currently residing in BC, who have lived in Canada for less than 5 years, and have their permanent resident status. The tool is free for BC employers and they're encouraged to sign-up to search for the appropriate candidates. Watch the video here.

    Files Attached:

    • BC Job Connect Initiative Information
    • Onboarding Refugees Toolkit                                                 

    Here are profiles of possible candidates looking for career in the IT sector and are open to moving to the Island:

    *Register on BC JobConnect to view the candidates profile in full. Watch a 42 seconds video on BC JobConnect Tool by clicking here entitled “We Make It Easy for Employers”.

    https://goo.gl/cX6Xgp   - SAP BW Consultant

    https://goo.gl/yyRP96   - IT Engineer

    https://goo.gl/uL7aLb   - Design Consultant

    https://goo.gl/qXZKxc  - Research Engineer/Backend Developer/Senior Algorithm Engineer

    https://goo.gl/n4EsTX  - Software Base Subscription (SBS) Project Manager

    https://goo.gl/sYSVuN  - Senior Consultant

    https://goo.gl/vuKskD  -  Engineering Manager

    https://goo.gl/1uC9po   -  Manager IT

    https://goo.gl/HgCenr  - Project Analyst

    https://goo.gl/85Ex4Q -  Software Developer

    https://goo.gl/2fqRrz  -  Programmer Analyst

    https://goo.gl/id7LJr  -  Web Design Assistant

    This is an opportunity for hiring managers to search for candidates through the platform and screen most suitable. Once you have reviewed the tool, you can set the “monitor search” to send alerts to your email every time a new candidate profile has been entered into the system matching your filter criteria. This feature is very productive - saving time and costly overheads to find talent. If a suitable candidate has been found, please click “Request Candidate Contact” and our project lead will forward you further information and connect you to the candidate.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    High-tech sector has more than 101,000 people now working in software development, advanced tech... see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    B.C.’s technology sector leads in growth: report

    The province’s high-tech sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 people now working in software development, advanced technology and research around the province.

    According to figures released Wednesday by the provincial government, the tech sector, which employs about 20,000 directly in Greater Victoria, employs more people around B.C. than the mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined.

    According to B.C. Stats’ Profile of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2016 Edition, technology now employs 101,700 people earning a weekly average salary of $1,590 – 75 per cent higher than the average wage in B.C. and higher than the Canadian technology sector average of $1,480 per week.

    “For the fifth year in a row, B.C. has seen significant growth in its diverse technology industry. We have more technology companies than ever, with more technology workers, earning higher wages than the Canadian technology sector average,” said Amrik Virk, Minister of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services. “Our #BCTECH strategy is further creating the conditions that are helping the sector continue to grow and thrive.”

    B.C.’s tech sector also leads the country in terms of job growth. Employment in the tech sector rose 2.9 per cent, surpassing B.C.’s overall employment growth of 2.5 per cent and national tech sector employment growth of 1.1 per cent.

    Technology now employs approximately 4.9 per cent of B.C.’s workforce and is the third-largest tech workforce in Canada.

    The gross domestic product of the province’s tech sector grew by 2.4 per cent in 2015, contributing $14.1 billion to B.C.’s overall economic output.

    At the same time, tech revenue increased five per cent to a record $26.3 billion.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Gunn estimates VIATEC fields 60 calls a year from small firms thinking of relocating to the city. see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    People come to Victoria for many reasons: temperate climate, west coast air and lifestyle, the small-town feel of the city and a spectrum of cultures that mix around the edges. But for young technology firms looking for a place to establish themselves and grow, or mature tech companies looking for an outpost, it’s not the craft beer, festival culture or green-tinged lifestyle that hooks them.

    It’s the talent.

    And Victoria appears to have plenty of it.

    Clayton Stark, who runs gaming studio Kixeye, said the chance to get truly great talent is one of the reasons the California-based company established its Victoria location in 2012.

    “Not all creative and technical people are created equal and because we have less competition for the A-players here it is within the realm of possibility that you could get an A-player,” Stark said.

    He noted top-flight engineers and developers in a place like Silicon Valley can cost a company millions of dollars. “The value of emerging talent in emerging markets like ours can be so much higher.”

    But landing that talent is tough when a company is competing with the likes of Google or Apple, which have immense resources.

    Change.org, the San Francisco-based site that provides a tool to help campaigns attract attention and support, saw the possibility to tap into Victoria’s wealth of engineering talent when it opened its office in August 2014.

    “They were looking to expand in Silicon Valley, but there’s a lot of competition for engineers,” said Chris Campbell, who runs Change’s Victoria office, made up almost entirely of engineers.

    “We said why not consider a Victoria office? We know a team of guys we could probably get to come as a group.”

    And they did. Last year Change started with six and it has grown steadily to 18, and could be 25 people by the end of the year.

    “Talent is what led to the office here for sure. We’ve had a lot of success in recruiting and management finds that very encouraging and is looking at doubling down its efforts to recruit in Victoria,” Campbell said. He added the lower overhead cost of office space compared with Silicon Valley and a competitive dollar don’t hurt, either.

    Some of the talent comes from the schools. The University of Victoria, Royal Roads and Camosun College combine to bring just under 40,000 students here at any given time. But some of the talent simply finds its way to the Island.

    Dan Gunn, chief executive of the Victoria Advanced Technology Council (VIATEC), said after 10 years of getting the light to shine on the Victoria tech scene, people in the big cities are starting to take notice.

    “We are starting to get some of that momentum,” he said.

    Gunn said technology has grown into to a $4-billion industry in Greater Victoria, employing more than 15,000 people directly,

    Gunn said he is now seeing people come to Victoria based on its lifestyle, climate and livability and worrying about what they’ll do once they’re settled. “They have chosen the life they want and then they’ll find the living,” he said. “A lot of people just move and then plug in to the city, and see what’s available or going on.”

    Lifestyle was a key consideration for Vecima Networks, which moved its headquarters, executives and research and development department to Victoria in 1997, while leaving its manufacturing division in Saskatchewan.

    “Our culture has always placed a high emphasis on work-life balance. Victoria offers excellent opportunities to our people in that regard and our strategy in locating here has been by and large very successful,” said chief executive Sumit Kumar. “Talent retention has been an area of strength for Vecima. We view being situated here as contributing greatly to leveraging that strength to build teams of highly engaged and productive people.”

    For Silkstart, a four-year-old Vancouver-based firm that develops websites for associations to improve their service to members, the move to Victoria 18 months ago was both for lifestyle and a chance to grow using the local talent.

    Shaun Jamieson, the firm’s chief executive, said after years working for Abebooks/Amazon, he wanted to build the company here. “It’s hard to find good people, but there are really good people that are here for a lifestyle reason. They want a place to raise kids or they are into the outdoors,” he said. “I felt I could build a good company here.”

    The company, which recently completed a round of financing for more than $500,000, will soon hire its eighth employee, and the plan is to grow here. “The lifestyle here is totally different than Vancouver,” said Jamieson, noting short commutes, cost of living and down-to-Earth people make all the difference.

    “There are people who want to move to Victoria and the only thing preventing them is getting a job, so if there is a tech shop that can hire a tonne of developers people will move here from Seattle, Toronto, Vancouver,” he said.

    Gunn said VIATEC has started actively attracting small firms.

    Gunn estimates VIATEC fields 60 calls a year from small firms thinking of relocating to the city.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Technology now typically employs more people than mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined see more

    Source: Quartz
    Author: Nevin Thompson

    Brexit and Trump could be good news for Canada’s tech scene

    By 2019, it’s estimated there will be 182,000 job openings in Canada’s tech sector—and no Canadians to fill them. Better-known for maple syrup, snow-capped mountains, and head-of-state heartthrob Justin Trudeau, Canada is also home to a vibrant tech sector that is crying out for workers. And Donald Trump’s unlikely presidency may already be helping Canadian tech firms fill those spots.

    On the night of Nov. 8, as many Americans realized that Trump was going to be elected president of the United States of America, a flood of hundreds of thousands of visitors crashed Canada’s immigration website. People were presumably looking for ways to relocate to Canada and escape whatever Trump has in store for the four years ahead.

    But in fact, Americans accounted for just half of the surge in visits to the immigration website—visitors from other parts of the world made up the other half. But why?

    Options for foreign workers looking to emigrate are narrowing. June’s Brexit decision in Britain was based in on a desire to tighten the UK’s border and restrict its flow of immigrants. Indeed, the future of the European Union, the world’s largest trade zone, is in question as anti-immigrant, right-wing parties in the Netherlands and in France seem poised for victory in 2017. In the US, on top of vowing to build a wall with Mexico and deport immigrants, Trump has promised to clamp down on the H-1B visas that bring 85,000 skilled international workersinto America each year.

    Meanwhile, across Canada, 71,000 tech companies are responsible for over 7% of Canada’s economic output and 5.6% of Canada’s total employment: Technology now typically employs more people than mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined. Canada, with its reputation for tolerance and openness to diversity and immigration, has been called one of the world’s last “safe harbors.” Add an almost unlimited demand for skilled workers across the country, and it’s easy to see why Canada could become the next hub for the globe-trotting workforce.

    “Donald Trump has definitely been a topic of conversation here in Seattle,” says Dan Gunn, chief executive officer of VIATEC, a Canada-based community organization and 16,000 square-foot technology accelerator. In the days following the US election, Gunn was spending time in Seattle for Startup Week. “There are questions about what Trump means for tech and for tech workers in the States. Highly skilled workers from around the world, particularly visible or religious minorities who had their sights set on moving to the US, might look to Canada for opportunities instead.”

    As head of VIATEC, Gunn helped build a thriving technology sector in Victoria—a small Canadian city of about 350,000 people located on an island just to the north of Seattle. Once known mainly as a sleepy government town and destination for retirees and tourists, Victoria is now home to a thriving tech scene that has attracted everyone from global giants like Amazon and Schneider Electric to game developers such as Kixeye and a Change.org satellite office.

    Just like the rest of the Canadian technology sector, Victoria—nicknamed “Tectoria”—has plenty of job openings. “Canada is growing, a thriving innovation sector, and advanced technology has become the number-one industry in Victoria,” Gunn says. “Nearly 900 companies employ over 23,000 people here. And they’re always hiring.”

    Across Canada, the need for workers is currently so great that a number of employers and industry organizations have banded together with the Canadian government to launch Go North Canada. The initiative is an attempt first and foremost to lure some of the more than 350,000 Canadians who work in Silicon Valley (as well as Canadians in other parts of the US) back home.

    “Canadian companies are currently looking to fill three different kinds, of roles: technical talent, experienced sales and marketing talent, and people in leadership roles who have experience scaling up companies,” says Heather Galt, vice president for human resources at Communitech, an Ontario technology-startup hub, who is helping promote the Go North Campaign across Canada. Galt says that Canada can often offer a better quality of life compared to working in the US: It has better schools, lower commute times, and a stunning natural environment.

    The Trudeau government has also announced a new strategy to make it easier for companies to recruit foreign tech talent. Compared to the H-1B visa process in the US, which can take about six months to set up, it normally takes nine months or more for foreign tech workers to receive a Canadian work visa.

    “Dealing with red tape is the number-one obstacle to bringing foreign talent to Canada,” says Noah Warder. Warder leads operations at Sendwithus, a Victoria-based startup that builds tools for email marketing. “It’s much easier to bring Canadians north of the border,” he says.

    While it’s still too early to determine whether or not Justin Trudeau’s new immigration strategy will make it easier to recruit foreign workers, the prospect of Canada’s attractive tech scene—not to mention its equally attractive outdoor wonderland—should give many foreign workers something to dream about.

    You can follow Nevin on Twitter at @Nevin_Thompson. Learn how to write for Quartz Ideas. We welcome your comments at ideas@qz.com.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    In the high-tech sector, employers are always on the hunt for experienced senior talent. see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Carla Wilson

    Victoria employers looking for new ways to attract and keep workers

    Competition to snap up employees in the capital region and elsewhere on Vancouver Island is so stiff that employers are developing new strategies to attract workers.

    Greater Victoria has one of the lowest unemployment rates in Canada; it was just five per cent in October, Statistics Canada said, behind only Guelph, Ont., and Vancouver.

    Look around the region and you’ll see help wanted signs posted in many business windows. Opportunities are available in a range of sectors, such as public administration where 3,700 new jobs were created in the past year.

    Construction, high-tech, and the restaurant sector are all mapping out plans to attract and retain more workers.

    The Vancouver Island Construction Association is offering a free six-week program for young people to deliver basic training and certifications that will get them started on a work site.

    Open to 15- to 19-year-olds, it has slots for a new government-funded Youth Constructing a Future program, starting Monday. Two more six-week programs will be offered after this one. It includes meeting with employers and visits to work sites.

    This is the latest step in a years-long campaign to attract people to trades at a time when B.C.’s economy is growing. Jobs are driven by hundreds of millions of dollars worth of projects such as high-rise condominiums, B.C. Hydro projects, new up-Island hospitals and military construction.

    The program is hoping to tap into unemployed young people between 15 and 24 years old in B.C. “We are still at a 14 per cent unemployment rate [in B.C. for young people], which is troubling,” said Greg Baynton, president of the Island Construction Association.

    B.C. needs 17,000 new entrants to the trades over the next nine years, he said. Of those, 15 to 20 per cent will be required on the Island.

    While the B.C. Construction Association said the average yearly wage of construction workers is $57,700, Baynton thinks that is a conservative figure.

    Workers who have completed apprenticeships can earn $25 to $35 per hour, plus benefits. Baynton said some trades, such as mechanical and carpentry, earn in the $70,000 to $80,000 per year range as employers respond to the tight labour market.

    Some workers have moved to B.C. from Alberta but while that helps the shortfall in employees, not all skills can be directly transferred, Baynton said. “It’s just a completely different environment.”

    In the high-tech sector, with its estimated 23,000 workers in Greater Victoria, employers are always on the hunt for experienced senior talent. “It’s not a new story,” said Dan Gunn, executive director of the Victoria Innovation, Advanced Technology and Entrepreneurship Council.

    Local post-secondary institutions funnel students and graduates to the tech sector. The capital region’s livability is among attractions that will pull experienced people here. And while locals complain about high housing prices, Victoria falls below other major cities, Gunn said. A lower cost of living, less commuting and lower health costs compared with the U.S. are among other advantages.

    The council is working on additional human resources training for its members to help them attract workers, including ways to lure people from the Lower Mainland, he said. These programs will be rolled out in the new year.

    At Victoria’s Latitude Geographics on Wharf Street, founder and CEO Steven Myhill-Jones said its latest job postings reflect company’s growth. The 17-year-old firm, supplying web-based maps for clients in Canada and internationally, has 130 employees.

    It attracts staff and retains staff with competitive compensation. Latitude is dedicated to making a difference in the world, meaning employees can be proud of what they do, he said.

    The other factor in retaining workers is a strong company culture. This includes company-supplied healthy snacks, a patio, yoga twice a week, continuing education, opportunities for advancement, and the chance to travel for work. As well, “we have a bottomless budget for books,” Myhill-Jones said.

    The B.C. Restaurant and Food Services Association is talking with provincial officials about how to attract and keep workers, with pilot programs also expected in the new year, said Ian Tostenson, the organization’s president and CEO.

    A shortage of workers is “serious all throughout the province,” he said. The sector has 180,000 employees in B.C.

    He anticipates projects will be launched early in 2017. This may mean the sector may have to rethink its business model by offering more stability in hours for workers and better benefits. It is smaller business that are affected the most, he said.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    GO Talent is a unique program, offered to IEPs who have not yet landed in Canada, yet are on route. see more

    New way to integrate global talent into the Canadian labour market

    ICTC’s immigration initiatives are paving the way towards integrating Internationally Educated ICT Professionals (IEPs) into Canada’s digital economy. GO Talent is a unique program, offered to IEPs who have not yet landed in Canada, yet are on route.

    GO Talent provides employers with early access to global ICT talent on their way to Canada, and assists internationally educated ICT professionals as they prepare to depart their home country. This combined approach directly contributes to the rapid labour-market integration of ICT professionals seeking employment in their field.

    Candidates who participate in this program generally have a background in ICT, whether it be education or work experience. Upon registering for the program, candidates are provided with virtual or in-person assistance including resume review, interview guidance and information about Canada’s ICT labour market.

    Resumes are sent to Canadian employers, and employers then have the option to interview or hire the candidate, depending on the skills match. ICTC has connections with employers nationwide, and these connections have expressed interest in hiring global talent. Over 1000 employers are already engaged through ICTC’s various immigration initiatives.

    To learn more about the initiative or to get involved, email talent@ictc-ctic.ca.

    Funded by:

     

     

    About ICTC:

    The Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) is a not-for- profit national centre of expertise for the digital economy. Through trusted research, innovative talent solutions, and practical policy advice, ICTC fosters innovative and globally competitive Canadian industries empowered by a talented and diverse digital workforce.

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    Thinklandia Festival is 7 days of creative speakers, artists, CEOs, physicists and storytellers see more

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

     

    Thinklandia Festival Speaker Line Up 2015
    September 11 to 17
    Yates St. Parkade Rooftop • 575 Yates St.
    NIghtly • Doors at 5:00pm • Event at 7:45pm • Free

    Brought to you by Telus, Rifflandia, the City of Victoria, Atomique Productions, VIATEC, InterArts, Fort Properties, and Stream of Consciousness
     

    ABOUT

    Thinklandia Festival is 7 days of creative speakers, artists, CEOs, physicists and storytellers sharing their creative experiences and wisdom in an interactive venue created from converting a parkade rooftop in downtown Victoria. Events are bright, vibrant, open, and entirely free, with dozens of speakers sharing thoughts and conversations with thousands of engaged people.

    Check out a huge new interactive environment by Scott Amos & David Parfitt (Money C), audio visual installations by Toni & Arya of EMP Productions, incredible speakers nightly, the launch of the inaugural Mayor's Medal, unveiling new arts installations and exhibitions, beer by Phillips, food, music, and a new kind of creative festival in Victoria.

     

    FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 11

    "Public"

    Featuring

    Jill Doucette • Synergy Enterprises
    Rande Cook • Visual Artist
    Lisa Helps • Mayor of Victoria
    hosted by Iain Russell

    Plus we will present the inaugural Mayor's Medal Awards (nominations open now at www.thinklandia.ca/mayorsmedal)

     

    SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 12

    “Edge of Knowledge”

    Edge of Knowledge is an exploration spanning through of years and billions of miles, from ancient wisdom known and taught for generations, to emerging notions of reality and the nature of existence, to aspects of reality that elude us still.

    Featuring

    Derek Muller • Veritasium, Australia
    Dr. Heather Berlin • Neuroscientist, NYC
    Baba Brinkman • Rapper, NYC
    hosted by Joey MacDonald

     

    SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 13

    "Illegal"

    ILLEGAL explores the contingencies, eccentricities, and everyday actions that exist outside of the typical realm of law, as well as the motivations and barriers experienced by those actively operating outside of the system.

    Featuring

    Stephen Reid • Author, bankrobber
    Sarah Smith AKA Ginger Kittens • PEERS, Burlesque dancer
    Hector Espinosa • Street artist, Mexico
    hosted by Ken Gordon

     

    MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14

    "Stories We Tell"

    A conversation among luminaries, mediums of history, crafters of culture, and interpreters of truth. This panel focuses on the power of storytelling, its role in history, the joys and dangers of fiction, and

    how the past informs the future through stories.

    Featuring

    Roy Henry Vickers • Visual artist, storyteller
    Susan Musgrave • Author, poet
    hosted by Missie Peters

    Also featuring Story Slam - an open invitation to submit your 4-5 minute story, and tell it to everyone at Stories We Tell. Got a fantastic story? Send us a note at ideas@thinklandia.ca and tell it at Story Slam.
     

    TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 15  

    "Perspective" 

    PERSPECTIVE explores the ability to approach common problems from an independent frame of reference, and the incredible new ideas generated from the simple practice of seeing differently. Perspective aims to reframe emerging discussions around broader opportunities for communication.

    Featuring

    Bif Naked • Musician, activist
    Rae Spoon • Musician, activist
    Jason Verners • Illusionist
    hosted by Sarah Kramer

     

    WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 16

    “Creativity”  

    Featuring

    Jordan Bower • Digital Storyteller
    Shaun Verreault • Wide Mouth Mason Lead Singer
    TEDxVictoriaSalon • Tiffany Poirier, a Vice Principal in SD61 • Jeff Hopkins, Founder of the Pacific School of Innovation and Inquiry
    hosted by Iain Russell

     

    THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 17

    Concurrent events:

    “Building A Creative City”
    Thinklandia HQ • 1001 Blanshard St
    Doors at 4:30pm • Event at 5:00pm • Free

    Featuring

    Jessica Hopper • Senior Editor, Pitchfork Magazine
    Kathryn Calder    • Singer/Songwriter
    Leeroy Stagger • Singer/Songwriter

     

    “Entrepreneurship”

    This event is in partnership with Experience Tectoria

    Yates St. Parkade Rooftop • 575 Yates St.
    Doors at 5:00pm • Event at 7:45pm • Free

    Featuring

    Peter Nowak • Award Winning Technology Journalist, Syndicated Blogger & Columnist
    Lauren Friese • Founder, TalentEgg.ca
    hosted by Ian Hoar

     

    Contact Details

    Joey MacDonald
    Creative Programming Director, Thinklandia
    programming@thinklandia.ca

  • Tessa Bousfield posted an article
    BC's tech sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 ppl now working in its ranks see more

    Source: Times Colonist
    Author: Andrew Duffy

    B.C.’s tech job force bigger than mining, oil and gas, forestry

    British Columbia’s technology sector has broken an employment record with more than 101,000 people now working in its ranks.

    Data Wednesday from the province show the tech sector — which employs about 20,000 in Greater Victoria — employs more people around B.C. than the mining, oil and gas, and forestry sectors combined.

    According to B.C. Stats’ Profile of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2016 Edition, technology employs 101,700 who earn a weekly average salary of $1,590 — 75 per cent higher than the average wage in B.C. and higher than the Canadian technology sector average of $1,480 per week.

    “For the fifth year in a row, B.C. has seen significant growth in its diverse technology industry. We have more technology companies than ever, with more technology workers earning higher wages than the Canadian average,” said Amrik Virk, minister of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services.

    “Our strategy is further creating the conditions that are helping the sector continue to grow and thrive.”

    B.C.’s tech sector, which has more than 9,900 companies, also leads the country in terms of job growth. Employment in the sector rose 2.9 per cent over the previous year, surpassing B.C.’s overall employment growth of 2.5 per cent and national tech-sector employment growth of 1.1 per cent.

    Technology now employs about 4.9 per cent of B.C.’s workforce and is the third-largest tech workforce in Canada.

    The gross domestic product of the province’s tech sector grew by 2.4 per cent in 2015, contributing $14.1 billion to B.C.’s overall economic output. At the same time tech revenue increased five per cent to a record $26.3 billion.

    “I think it is wonderful news and a long time in the making,” said Victoria tech veteran Eric Jordan, CEO of Codename Entertainment. “This didn’t happen overnight, but is the result of decades of effort from many people and organizations in our community.”

    Jordan said Victoria’s tech community has a lot going for it. “Victoria continues to be a great place to build technology companies, including video-game companies. We are large enough to have a variety of critical supports, such as educational institutions like UVic and Camosun, as well as easy access to key hubs such as Vancouver, Seattle, Toronto and San Francisco,” he said.